Employment for English Majors

Contrary to popular belief, becoming an English major does not end one’s hopes of getting a job after graduation. As several recent articles attest, employers want the skills that English majors have. Even so committed a fan of the sciences as the CEO of Logitech, Bracken Darrell, argues that liberal arts majors, and English majors in particular, have the “soft skills” that many of the more technically-oriented employees lack. English majors have an ability to communicate ideas clearly, and to be willing to reflect critically on those ideas, that Darrell finds essential to leadership. Similarly, Bruna Martinuzzi, the leader of the training firm Clarion Enterprises, enumerates several characteristics of English majors that meet key needs in business, ranging from research skills to empathy. Finally, Bobby Tudor, CEO of the Houston energy firm Tudor, Pickering, Holt and Co., identifies himself as “A big advocate of liberal arts education”:

When you’re asked the age-old question: “Gosh, what are you going to do with an English degree?” the answer is, “anything I want.” The value was I learned to read critically. I learned to write well. I learned to think on my feet. I learned to probe and ask questions. I got educated. I think that’s what you’re supposed to do when you go to college. 1

Indeed, it is the adaptability of the English major that makes it such a valuable investment.

To get an idea of the various jobs possible with an English major, visit our link. Many of our majors are seeking certification to teach English Language Arts and Reading in Texas high schools. Still others plan to go on to graduate school, or to seek careers in writing or editing. Whatever your goals, an English degree from Howard Payne University can help you achieve them.