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Be Still

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Be Still

“Be still and know that I am God.” Psalm 46:10

“Still” is not an easy adverb for me. My job is to “do.” My affirmation comes primarily from doing. As a Christian I am expected to “do” the will of God.

Thus, I have chosen to be a part of a doing church‑‑a church and denomination noted for activity and involvement. And I am thankful to be a part of such a church. But I sense that I, and my fellow church members, often run out of steam and spiritual peace in the practice of our doing.

Could it be that to truly know God and “to do” His will, I have to “be still.” Paul Turnier, the noted physician and author, once said to a group of us that, “When God really wants to get our attention, He whispers.” Maybe I need to pause in my busy-ness and dampen the noise of life about me so that I can hear that whisper. Then, possibly, my doing will take on more direction and meaning.

Be…

Be still…

Be still and know…

Be still and know that I am God.

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The devotional this week is submitted by Wilson Wayne Grant, a 1962 graduate of HPU. He is married to Veronica Sorley, a 1965 graduate of HPU. They have two children and four grandchildren. He completed his medical training at the University of Texas in Galveston. He practices pediatrics in San Antonio. He loves writing, and his latest book is Living the Lord’s Prayer Day by Day. Dr. Grant currently severs on the HPU Board of Trustees.

The Discipline of Meditation

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I’ll ponder all the things you’ve accomplished, and give a long, loving look at your acts.   
 Psalm 77.12 (The Message)

There is a great difference between glancing and gazing.  We glance at a friend’s familiar face, but we gaze into the eyes of a person we deeply love and are moved by the power of such emotion.  We glance at a newspaper article, but we gaze at a legal document we are expected to sign and realize that understanding is a powerful thing.  We glance at a snowman standing on a neighbor’s lawn, but we gaze at a snow-covered mountain and find ourselves awed and humbled at the majesty spread before us.  It is the same with our relationship with God.  When we want to move from the glance of acquaintance to the gaze of intimacy, we are ready for Christian meditation.

Unlike various other forms of meditation, Christian meditation is not about us or “getting in touch with” ourselves.  The psalmist wrote, “I’ll ponder all the things you’ve accomplished, and give a long, loving look at your acts” (Psalm 77.12, The Message).  Like the other spiritual disciplines, meditation involves slowing down and being unhurried.  It is then that we can gaze upon God’s Word, His amazing works in our lives, His people (seeing them as He does and rejoicing in them), or His creation.

A gaze not only lingers longer than a glance, but a gaze also produces far more than a glance.  The gaze upon God that we enjoy in meditation will produce within us a stronger love for Him, a deeper insight into His truth, a sweeter appreciation for His creation, and a calmer, more serene spirit just because we are more keenly aware of how near He is.

In 1903, after two of his nieces died from diphtheria, Cleland B. McAfee wrote the words to the beautiful hymn, “Near to the Heart of God.”  It is a spot that he described as a place of quiet rest, a place of full release, and a place of comfort sweet.  Meditation ushers us into that chamber of precious intimacy.

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This week’s devotional is provided by Vicki Vaughn who committed her life to Christ as a nine-year-old child.  She is a graduate of the University of Corpus Christi with a Bachelor’s Degree in English, of Fuller Theological Seminary with a Master’s Degree in Theology, and of Truett Theological Seminary with a Doctor of Ministry degree.
She is the mother of Dr. Melody Bynum Pickle and Austin Bynum, both of whom are graduates of Howard Payne University.  She is the grandmother of one grandson, Asa (8 years old), and two granddaughters, Megan and Skylar Rae (11-year-old twins).
Vicki has been in vocational Christian service for the past forty-six years.  She has partnered in ministry with Dr. Richard Jackson, as his research/administration/counseling assistant at North Phoenix Baptist Church in Phoenix, Arizona, and as the Executive Director of the Richard Jackson Center for Evangelism and Encouragement, located in Brownwood.
Also, Vicki has served as the Ministry Guidance Director at Howard Payne University where she teaches Theology of Worship, Spiritual Formation, Evangelism, Introduction to the Ministry, Supervised Ministry, and Introduction to the New Testament.  Her responsibilities at HPU also include supervising internships of students who are pursuing their Master’s degree.